Name Name

title
descript
Username:
Password: *
Remember me
* Forgot your password? Click Here

Bringing Solar Power To Remote Hospitals Is Saving Lives

  • Posted by Peter Glatzer on September 25, 2014 in Energy
  • Founded by three Yale University Medical School students, Possible is a nonprofit health care company that runs medical facilities in remote Nepal. These include the 25-bed Bayalpata Hospital, in Anchham, a series of local clinics, and a small army of community health care workers.

    Part of its model revolves around importing Western standards of medicine and management, including modern equipment and electronic systems for patient records, HR and accounting. But in one aspect Possible (previously Nyaya Health) found itself relying on local infrastructure--energy--which was causing problems. Anchham's grid works intermittently, if at all, and most people fend for themselves with diesel-powered generators. Diesel is relatively expensive and needs to be brought in from faraway. Anchham is a 14-hour drive from the nearest airport.

    Possible has therefore turned to solar power. In 2011, it started working with Andy Moon and Jason Gray, then at SunEdison, to install solar panels at its facilities. Moon and Gray have since formed SunFarmer, a U.S. nonprofit with a hybrid model for spreading solar around the globe. It funds installations at health care facilities using donations. Clients then pay back the cost over an eight-year period, with SunFarmer covering maintenance. Any proceeds left over are then reinvested in future projects.

    For several years, international agencies and nonprofits have installed many solar panels across the developing world. But they haven't always followed up with the necessary cleaning and repairs. Moon says there are dozens of defunct systems in Asia and Africa, including one or two in Nepal itself.

    "Solar is the perfect solution in these remote areas where diesel is expensive and unreliable," he says. "The issue is that there's been a lot of one-off donations and they're often not working after six or 12 months. That's because there's no maintenance." MORE

     

    By Ben Schiller

    Via Co.Exist 

    Photo courtesy of Possible


    SHARE

    Tags:

    Comments:

    RELATED

    Obama Announces Solar Power Support

  • The President declares federal loan guarantees for solar energy projects.
  • more
  • Yeti 1250 Solar Generator Kit

  • Goal Zero's solar generator kit silently cranks out clean backup power
  • more
  • The World's Largest Solar Farm From Above

  • Aerial photos of the Ivanpah solar thermal plant by Jamie Stillings
  • more